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Construction Accidents - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What are the steps to starting the process for compensation for my construction site accident?
  2. What are the most common injuries suffered on a construction site?
  3. What is OSHA?
  4. If I'm injured while working on a construction site, can I get more than just workers' compensation?
  5. Who is liable if a person is injured by debris from a construction site while walking on a public sidewalk next to that site?


What are the steps to starting the process for compensation for my construction site accident?

Although every construction injury claim is different, there are certain universal steps you can do to help your claim. These steps generally include:

  • Enter the details in the employer's record book as soon as possible after the accident. Be sure to enter the specifics yourself, or insist on viewing any entry as it is made.
  • Gather the names, addresses and telephone numbers of any potential witnesses to your accident.
  • If possible take photographs of the location of the accident as soon as you can.
  • Organize and write all details of the accident down as soon as possible and include all events that led up to it.
  • Photograph any machinery, plants, tools, supports, or vehicles involved.
  • Photograph and document all visible injuries.
  • Consult a doctor to give medical treatment and also to document your injuries and conditions.


What are the most common injuries suffered on a construction site?

There are literally thousands of potential hazards on a construction site. Heavy equipment, dangerous chemicals, and rushed production schedules can significantly increase the injury rates of workers, supervisors, and even people in the surrounding areas. OSHA states that most injuries on construction sites involve excavation cave-ins, power tool accidents, falls, electrical hazards, and exposure to potentially dangerous materials such as asbestos, lead, benzene, and vinyl chloride.

What is OSHA?

OSHA stands for Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It is responsible for enacting and enforcing rules that govern workplace health and safety to prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths.

If I'm injured while working on a construction site, can I get more than just workers' compensation?

Your financial recovery against your employer in Minnesota is limited by Workers' Compensation laws, but remember that other parties may be legally responsible for your injuries, including third-party contractors, property owners, or equipment manufacturers.

Who is liable if a person is injured by debris from a construction site while walking on a public sidewalk next to that site?

In some circumstances, the injured person will be able to recover damages from the construction company, which has a duty to take reasonable steps to keep public sidewalks near its construction site free from bricks and other debris. If the company fails to remove such obstructions and someone trips and falls, the company may be liable. Construction companies should also tell pedestrians they can be injured if they stray from the sidewalk. Posting a sign is usually not enough. If a company fails to place barriers and warning lamps by a building pit, for example, it may be responsible if anyone falls into it and is injured.