> > > Dog Bite Injuries - Frequently Asked Questions

Dog Bite Injuries - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Who can sue for dog bite injuries and who will be liable?
  2. What types of damages are available to someone who has been injured by a dog?
  3. Is the dog owner covered by insurance?
  4. What are dangerous breeds laws?
  5. Do I have a claim if I went to a house to perform work and was bitten by the property owner's dog?


Who can sue for dog bite injuries and who will be liable?

The injured victim can bring a claim or a lawsuit. When a minor child has been bitten by a dog, the claim needs to be brought by the parents both on behalf of the minor child and for themselves. A claim or lawsuit would be against the owner of the dog, or the person who is in control of the dog at the time of the bite.

What types of damages are available to someone who has been injured by a dog?

Some of the types of damages that may be available include medical expenses, lost wages, lost earning capacity and pain and suffering. If your state has a dog bite statute, it may prescribe the types of damages that are available. Please contact one of our attorneys to learn more about your state's dog bite laws and the types of damages you may be entitled to for a dog bite injury.

Is the dog owner covered by insurance?

Yes, generally under their homeowner's insurance policy; almost all homeowner's policies cover for attacks and bites by pets.

What are dangerous breeds laws?

Some states and cities have passed laws limiting ownership and/or requiring registration of certain breeds they have deemed to be "dangerous." These are typically large breeds of dogs and may include Pit Bull Terriers, Rottweilers, Chow Chows, German Shepherds and Akitas, for example.

Do I have a claim if I went to a house to perform work and was bitten by the property owner's dog?

In most cases, if you are asked into a house (or onto property) to perform work for someone, the person who owns the property has a legal responsibility to take reasonable efforts to protect you from injury. Thus, if the person has a pet, the person might be responsible for keeping the pet away from you, or at least warning you of the presence of the animal. Note that you may also have a workers' compensation claim if the injury occurred during the course of work. Because every case is unique, however, you should consult one of our attorneys for further clarification.